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Milonga

Music Sound

Milonga

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Milonga is a South American form of music, as dance, as the term for the place where tango is danced. The term milonga comes from a similar African expression that means "lyrics."

Contents

Music

The Milonga originated in the Río de la Plata area of Argentina and Uruguay, and was very popular in the 1870s. The Milonga was derived from an earlier style of singing known as the payada de contrapunto.

The song was set to a lively 2/4 tempo, and often included musical improvisation. Over time, dance steps and other musical influences were added, eventually giving rise to the tango. Despite 2/4 formula, rhythm is irregular. It is syncopated, consisting of 8 beats with accents on the 1st, 4th, 5th and 7th beats.

  • Regular 2/4

[1] 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 8

  • Milonga

[1] 2 3 [4] [5] 6 [7] 8

  • 332

[1] 2 3 [4] 5 6 [7] 8

Dance

Although Milonga uses the same basic elements as Tango, it is much nearer to the African roots, especially in that it requires a greater relaxation of legs and body. Movement is normally faster, and pauses are not made: As the beat goes on, dancers continue setting their feet. It is rather a kind of rhythmic walking without complicated figures, with a much more "rustic" style than Tango.

There are different styles of Milonga: Milonga Lisa (Simple Milonga), in which the dancer steps on every beat of the music; and Milonga con Traspié, in which the dancer uses Traspiés or contrapasos (changes of weight from one foot to the other and back again in double time) to interpret the music. Thus, dynamics may be danced without having to run fast or without the use of much space.

See also

External links


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Music Sound, v. 2.0, by MultiMedia

This guide is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia.


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