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Detroit techno

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Detroit techno

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Detroit techno
Stylistic origins: Electro, Synthpop, Chicago house
Cultural origins: Detroit, Michigan, USA
Typical instruments: Analog synthesizer, Drum machine
Mainstream popularity: Large underground following, low mainstream popularity
Derivative forms: Acid house
Subgenres
Acid techno
Fusion genres
Minimal techno
Other topics
Electronic music

Detroit techno is an early style of techno music originating from Detroit, Michigan, USA in the mid-1980s. A distinguishing trait of Detroit techno is the use of analog synthesizers and early drum machines, notably the roland TR-909 for its production or, in later releases, the use of digital emulation to create the characteristic sounds of those machines.

Contents

History

Origins

The three individuals most closely associated with the birth of Detroit techno as a genre are the "Belleville Three"; Juan Atkins, Kevin Saunderson and Derrick May. These three high school friends from a Detroit suburb would soon find their basement tracks in dancefloor demand, thanks in part to seminal Detroit radio personality The Electrifying Mojo. Mojo not only played the early homegrown techno tracks, but also influenced the new sound by playing electronic music from techno and electronic music pioneers like Kraftwerk, Philip Glass, New Order and Afrika Bambaataa.

Influences also came from Chicago's early style of house music [1]. Although producers in both cities used the same hardware and even collaborated on projects and remixes together, Detroiters traded the choir-friendly vocals of House with metallic clicks, robotic voices and repetitive hooks reminiscent of an automotive assembly line. Many of the early techno tracks had futuristic or robotic themes, although a notable exception to this trend was a single by Derrick May under his pseudonym Rhythim is Rhythim, called "Strings of Life." This vibrant dancefloor anthem was filled with rich synthetic string arrangements and took the underground music scene by storm in May of 1987. With subtle differences between the genres, clubs in both cities included Detroit techno and Chicago house tracks in their playlists without objection (or much notice by non-audiophiles) from patrons.

Second wave

Once Detroit Techno became a full-fledged musical genre, a second generation of regional artists developed into techno icons themselves; Jeff Mills, Richie Hawtin (aka Plastikman) and Carl Craig to name just a few. Mills began his career as "The Wizard" on Mojo's nightly broadcast, showcasing his turntablist skills with quick cuts of the latest underground tracks and unreleased music from local labels.

In the mid-to-late 1990s, Detroit Techno producers experimented with extended aural soundscapes featuring sparse, ambient underscores punctuated with sporadic, cyclical periods of percussion. Extended length vinyl projects like those under Hawtin's Plastikman facade are particularly clear examples of this period. Atkins "Sonic Sunset" CD in 1994 also delivered this new tradition of Detroit techno.

On Memorial Day weekend of 2000, electronic music fans from around the globe made a pilgrimage to Hart Plaza on the banks of the Detroit River and experienced the first Detroit Electronic Music Festival. In 2003 the festival management changed the name to Movement, then Fuse-In (2005), and most recently, Movement: Detroit's Electronic Music Festival (2006). The festival is a showcase for DJs and performers across all genres of electronic music.

Quotes

Derrick May once described Detroit techno music as being a "complete mistake ... like George Clinton and Kraftwerk stuck in an elevator."

Detroit area producers

Juan Atkins
Kevin Saunderson
Kenny Larkin
Derrick May
Carl Craig
Richie Hawtin
Eddie Fowlkes
Jeff Mills
Mike Banks
Marc Kinchen
Octave One
James Pennington
Drexciya
Blake Baxter
Claude Young
Keith Tucker

Detroit area record labels

Underground Resistance
430 West
Direct Beat
Transmat
KMS
Metroplex
Planet E
Fragile
Cratesavers

Notable Detroit Techno DJ's

T. Linder
DJ Rolondo
Buzz Goree
Detroit Techno Militia Collective

Other notable producers

Aril Brikha
Sean Deason
Fabrice Lig
Maas
Slam
Surgeon (musician)

Techno
Acid - Detroit - 4-beat - Gabber - Ghettotech - Hardcore - Happy hardcore - Minimal - Nortec - Rave - Schranz - Tech house
Other electronic music genres
Ambient | Breakbeat | Drum and bass | Electronica | Electronic art music | Hard dance | Hardcore | House | Techno | Trance | Industrial | Synthpop

Home | Up | Happy hardcore | Hardcore techno | 4-beat | Acid techno | Breakbeat hardcore | Detroit techno | Digital hardcore | Freetekno | Ghettotech | Minimal techno | Nortec | Rave music | Schranz | Terrorcore | Wonky techno

Music Sound, v. 2.0, by MultiMedia

This guide is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia.


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