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Luxating Patella

Cats

Luxating Patella

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Luxating patella, or trick knee, is a condition in which the patella, or kneecap, dislocates or moves out of its normal location. The luxation is usually medial, but can be lateral. It can be caused by some form of blunt trauma, or may be a congenital defect. In congenital cases, it is usually bilateral. Patellar luxation is a common condition in dogs, particularly small and miniature breeds. The condition usually becomes evident between the ages of 4 to 6 months. It also occurs in cats, especially the Domestic Shorthair.

Diagnosis is made through palpation of the knee. Rarely, x-rays are necessary. The luxating patella often causes no or very slight symptoms. There may be intermittent limping in the rear leg. Osteoarthritis can develop secondarily. There are several stages in patellar luxation, ranging from minor (the patella's position is normal most of the time) to very serious (the patella is permanently luxated). The more serious stages require surgery to correct, if the animal has difficulty walking. The surgery involves deepening the groove (trochlea) that the patella sits in.

References

  • Ettinger, Stephen J.;Feldman, Edward C.(1995).Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine(4th ed.). W.B. Saunders Company. ISBN 0-7216-6795-3

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